Cultivating Community through Creativity

February 4, 2019 in Art & Culture, Community

“The artists musicians and designers, they make the city colourful. And they bring life to the city. And even if you don’t think you like art or music, you probably do, and you probably enjoy those type of people in your city, because they really create that culture and create that community.” – Angel Guerra

In 2018, Market Collective celebrated their 10 year anniversary. A lot has changed for the company since their humble beginnings in 2008. John talks with Angel who has been running this Calgary-based artisan market since day one. Angel, along with co-founder Angela Dione, decided to chip in $50 each to launch Market Collective together. The result? In the last three years alone, the markets have generated $5 million in sales for local artisans and artists.

Brewing Up Community

November 26, 2018 in Business, Community

“The vaunted ‘third space’ isn’t home, and isn’t work – it’s more like the living room of society at large. It’s a place where you are neither family nor co-worker, and yet where the values, interests, gossip, complaints and inspirations of these two other spheres intersect. It’s a place at least one step removed from the structures of work and home, more random, and yet familiar enough to breed a sense of identity and connection. It’s a place of both possibility and comfort, where the unexpected and the mundane transcend and mingle.

And nine times out of ten, it’s a bar.”

This is a quote from Michael Hickey, a community developer in the U.S. A few years back, he wrote an article called “In Praise of Loud and Stinky Bars”. Hickey wrote that bars act as vital gathering spaces for communities.

And he’s definitely not the only one that sees the value in local bars and breweries.

Today, you’ll hear from Vanessa Mathews and Mark Heise about how breweries can provide a sense of place, build up other industries and give back to their community, one pint a time.

Resources

Park(ing) Day

October 1, 2018 in Community, Design

In North American cities, there are 4 parking stalls for every car. Downtown cores usually devote 30% of their space for parking. And the average car sits stationary for 95% of its life. That’s a lot of space for vehicle storage. Do you ever wonder how all that asphalt could be used differently? How a parking stall could be transformed into a place for people to enjoy? We wanted to talk to someone who makes us rethink how space in cities could be used.

John Bela is the co-founder of Park(ing) Day, an annual event where parking stalls are transformed into temporary public places.

Resources